» » » Conversations, Part Two

Conversations, Part Two

Random bits and pieces of conversations with people I’ve met along the way.

PR Police

Macon, Georgia. I was taking a photo when I heard a voice ask if I was an Allman Brothers fan. I turned around to see a parking enforcement officer standing next to his “patrol cart”. Stanley Honeycutt was his name. Retired police officer.

Stanley: “I’ve lived in Macon all my life and I can tell you a little something about the Allman Brothers that you won’t read in the brochure. They lived in another house before the Big House. It’s a vacant lot now, but Duane Allman drew a mushroom in the sidewalk when the cement was wet. That mushroom is still there. It’s over on College Street.”

Me: “Cool. I’ll be walking that direction later today, can you give me a specific location?”

Stanley: “I’ll do better than that. I’ll take you there. Hop in.”

Me: “Really? Are you combination parking enforcement and tour guide?”

Stanley: “Yep. I’m the PR Police.”

During the ride over to College Street, Stanley told me a story.

Stanley: “I became a police officer when I was a young man. The chief told me I was a likable kinda guy and he wanted me to serve on foot downtown so I could get to know all the business owners. He wanted good public relations. One day I was walking my beat and these two gals pull up next to me to ask for directions. I told them I would be happy to show them the way and I got in their car with them. At the end of the day the chief was a little upset. Said he was looking for me everywhere and couldn’t find me, so I told him about those two gals and how I was their tour guide for the day and showed them all over town. He wasn’t happy, but I reminded him that he wanted me to be the PR guy and I was out PR’ing with two lovely ladies just like he told me to do.”

I Can Make You Rich

The Greyhound station in Atlanta has a counter with a row of outlets for passengers to charge their electronics while waiting for their bus. I plugged in my iPhone and my backup battery to charge, then sat down about eight feet away. Within a few minutes a young man, who looked to be about 25, came over and sat beside me. 

Young Man (without introduction): “I can get you a job.”

Me: “I don’t need a job. I already have one.”

Young Man: “I can make you rich.”

Me: “I don’t want to be rich.”

Young Man: “Why, you don’t like money?”

Me: “There’s a lot more to life than money.”

Young Man: “Maybe, but we all need money. I can make you rich.”

Me: “Really? What do you do?”

Young Man: “Music producer.”

Me: “That’s cool. I wish you much success in your business.”

Young Man: “You should at least take my number. Get in touch with me and we can do some business.”

Me: “No thank you.”

I’m sure he was a little disappointed that I wasn’t making much eye contact with him when he talked, but I was keeping an eye on the guy who came into the station with him. They were talking when they came in, then separated. While one guy was talking to me, the other was hanging around the charging counter eyeing my iPhone. 

Leave a Reply